mkvenom - A Bash script which automates generation of commonly used Metasploit Framework msfvenom payloads
About mkvenom.sh:
 * 🐍 mkvenom.sh is a Bash script which generates a selection of common Metasploit Framework msfvenom payloads for a specific target machine.
 * The idea is to kick this off in the background while performing initial scanning and enumeration of a target during a penetration test activity to speed up your testing workflow (see also: ptboot). It's slow and it's imprecise, but in some circumstances it can be a good time saving tool.

Features:
   This script will create commonly used Metasploit Framework payloads such as reverse meterpreter shells, bind shells etc., including 32-bit/64-bit and staged/inline variants.

   It will produce a directory called payloads which will contain a library of ready to use payload files built using the local and remote TCP/IP parameters specified via the command line:

Requirements:
   The only requirements are the presence of Metasploit Framework 4.16+ and the Bash shell.
   This script is intended for use in a Linux environment and has been tested on Kali Linux 2018.3 and ParrotSec 4.1.

Install and run:
Usage:
   Clone or download the mkvenom.sh file from this repository in to your Linux environment. You might want to consider placing it in ~/bin or /usr/local/bin.

   A directory called payloads will be created in the current working directory when the script runs.

   Command line usage syntax:

   
   For example, if the local penetration tester's system has an IP address of 192.168.10.200 and a remote Linux target system has an IP address of 10.20.20.1:
      mkvenom.sh 10.20.20.1 4444 192.168.10.200 443 linux

   In the above example, payloads which bind to an address on the target would use port 4444 whilst payloads which make reverse connections back to the local machine would use port 443.

License: This software is published here under the MIT licence.

Disclaimer: This software is provided "as is" without any representations or warranties, express or implied.

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1 Comments

phraxoid said…
Thanks for featuring my tool! A little more info about mkvenom.sh on my website: https://devtty.io/2018/02/computing/speed-up-metasploit-payload-generation-with-mkvenom/
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